Legal Resources

My husband’s medical condition was misdiagnosed. Who should be held responsible?

When a serious injury or even death results from a misdiagnosed condition, there are several parties that can be held liable. This includes doctors, radiologists, nurses, and pharmacists as potentially responsible parties. However, for a medical professional to be held liable for medical malpractice, there are specific legal requirements under the Commonwealth of Massachusetts law. Restrictions stipulate when a claim can be made, limit the damages, and require specific types of evidence. Failing to diagnose or misdiagnosing an illness or condition can qualify as medical malpractice if it can be proven that a doctor or healthcare provider was negligent. This

Read More »

How much time do I have to file a personal injury case in Massachusetts?

The timeframe in which you have to file your lawsuit is called the statute of limitations. The majority of personal injury cases in Massachusetts have a statute of limitations of three years. The statute of limitations begins on the date in which the personal injury incident occurs. Therefore, you generally have three years from this date to start your lawsuit. There are a few exceptions to this rule, however. For instance actions against the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA). You only have two years to file a suit for injuries you sustain as a passenger on public transit. To ensure your personal injury

Read More »

My mother slipped while walking through an icy mall parking lot and broke her arm. Who is responsible for her injury?

Slip and fall accidents are common when weather conditions are wet and icy. When it comes to maintaining the safety of public areas, such as parking lots or sidewalks, the property owner has a duty to exercise reasonable care. This is a legal duty, and failure to do so can result in negligence. The periodic inspection of the property and the removal or remediation of snow and ice within a reasonable time is the duty of property owners to reduce the risk of falls and injuries. The commonwealth of Massachusetts no longer practices the “natural accumulation” rule, which relieved a

Read More »
Top